State

Washington ag eyes better trade deals as Trump nixes trade deal

Editor’s note: WAWG Executive Director Michelle Hennings is quoted in this story. From the Tri-City Herald The Trans-Pacific Partnership would have opened new markets and reduced tariffs for a variety of Washington-produced crops. But as President Donald Trump removes the U.S. from the controversial and complex TPP agreement, Washington’s trade-dependent agricultural industry reacted with a mix of disappointment and relief. Read the rest of ... Read More »

Crop insurance deadlines near in PNW

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Risk Management Agency (RMA) reminds farmers in Idaho, Oregon and Washington that the final date to purchase or modify federal crop insurance coverage on most 2017 spring-planted crops is approaching. Farmers can also purchase the Whole-Farm Revenue Protection policy for 2017 crops. For 2017 spring-planted onions in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington, and cabbage in Oregon ... Read More »

Growers testify in Senate ag committee work session on DNR bill

On Thursday, members and staff of the Washington Association of Wheat Growers testified in front of the Washington State Senate’s Agriculture, Water, Trade and Economic Development Committee during a public hearing on SB 5051, a bill relating to non-default termination provisions in state land leases for agricultural or grazing purposes. Chad Smith and Nicole Berg, both wheat farmers from Benton ... Read More »

Legislative update: Challenging session ahead

By Diana Carlen WAWG Lobbyist The Washington State Legislature convened for the 2017 regular session on Monday, Jan. 9. In odd calendar years, regular legislative sessions are scheduled for 105 days and are referred to as “long” sessions because the Legislature needs to adopt the state operating budget. This is expected to be a very challenging budget year because the ... Read More »

WSDA director: We have a plan for wheat woes

From the Capital Press Washington’s agriculture Director Derek Sandison outlined for lawmakers Tuesday his plan to help the state’s export-dependent wheat farmers meet a key international benchmark for quality, though none of the measures appear to be quick or easy. “We have a plan. We’re moving forward with it,” Sandison told the House Agriculture and Natural Resources Committee. “It’s not ... Read More »

WAWG makes sure wheat issues don’t get lost in D.C. transition

Leadership and staff of the Washington Association of Wheat Growers (WAWG) recently traveled to Washington, D.C., to meet with various federal agencies as they make the transition to a new administration. “There are a lot of changes happening in Washington, D.C., as the new administration prepares to take over,” said Michelle Hennings, executive director of WAWG. “We wanted to meet ... Read More »

What’s coming down the halls of Olympia in 2017?

By Diana Carlen WAWG Lobbyist On Monday, the Washington State Legislature began the 2017 Legislative session in Olympia. Because it is an odd-numbered year, it will be a “long” session that is scheduled to last at least 105 days due to it being a budget year. The primary focus will be producing an operating, transportation and capital budget for the state for 2017-2019 ... Read More »

WAWG volunteers needed for Spokane Ag Expo

The Washington Association of Wheat Growers is looking for volunteers to work in the  Ag Expo booth in Spokane on Feb. 7-9, 2017. We would like to have at least two people per shift, with 4 shifts per day. As a volunteer, you will receive a pass good for free admission to the show (for the duration of the show). Visit https://greaterspokane.org/ag-expo/ for the show ... Read More »

First forecast of stripe rust for 2017

By Xianming Chen The current forecast is that highly susceptible winter wheat varieties would have 6 percent yield loss, in the low epidemic level range (0-20 percent yield loss). Based on this forecast, currently grown varieties would not have significant yield loss and early fungicide application at the time of herbicide application time for winter wheat would not be necessary. This ... Read More »