Tag Archives: dams

Northwest wheat states respond to draft EIS

On behalf of the Northwest wheat-producing states, we strongly support the findings in the Columbia River System Operations Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), specifically the Preferred Alternative for the operations, maintenance and configuration of the Columbia River System. Together, our four states produce over 500 million bushels of wheat annually. Much of that wheat is bound for export markets.Pacific Northwest ... Read More »

Washington wheat sides with federal report to preserve Snake River dams

From the Washington Association of Wheat Growers and the Washington Grain Commission Nearly four years after U.S. District Court Judge Michael Simon ordered the federal government to develop an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) that included a dam breaching alternative for restoring endangered species salmon runs, the draft report reviewed and rejected the approach. Released jointly by the U.S. Army Corps ... Read More »

Grower comments needed on Columbia River System Operations draft EIS

The Columbia River Systems Operations draft EIS was released today by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Bureau of Reclamation and Bonneville Power Administration. The EIS presents a no-action course and five alternatives, one of which includes breaching the four lower Snake River dams. According to the executive summary, “Despite the major benefits to fish expected from (breaching the lower Snake River ... Read More »

Waterways association opposes Brown support for breaching dams

From the Capital Press Oregon Gov. Kate Brown’s support for breaching four Snake River dams as a long-term goal has sparked a strong rebuke from the Pacific Northwest Waterways Association. Read more here. Read More »

Oregon governor is off base. Breaching the Snake River dams is not the answer

By the Sri-City Herald Editorial Board Oregon Gov. Kate Brown’s support for a future without the Snake River dams does not align with reality. Her letter, penned to Washington Gov. Jay Inslee earlier this month, stated that, “The science is clear that removing the earthen portion of the four lower Snake River dams is the most certain and robust solution ... Read More »

Growers urged to submit comments when EIS released

By Trista Crossley We are less than two months into 2020, and it’s already proven to be a busy year where the Columbia-Snake River System is concerned. In January, Washington Gov. Jay Inslee’s office finished accepting public comments on their draft report on the impacts of breaching the lower Snake River dams. And later this month, a draft environmental impact ... Read More »

Snake River dam speakers focus on impacts

From the Capital Press Representatives supporting agriculture, fish and other uses spoke Jan. 13 during the third and final public workshop on the draft of Washington Gov. Jay Inslee’s study of the four lower Snake River dams. Read the rest of the article here. Read More »

Stakeholders urged to attend dam study workship

From the Capital Press River advocates say it is important for farmers, ranchers and other industry representatives to attend meetings about the Washington governor’s study on dams on the Lower Snake River. Environmental groups have for years called for the removal of the Ice Harbor, Lower Monumental, Little Goose and Lower Granite dams, citing their impacts on federally protected salmon ... Read More »

Study: US would lose over $2.3 billion by breaching lower Snake River dams

Loss of dams would also significantly increase carbon emissions and impacts to fragile economies The removal of four lower Snake River dams would cost the U.S. over $2.3 billion over the next 30 years, lead to significant additional carbon emissions that contribute to climate change, and jeopardize health, safety and livelihoods in already economically fragile local and regional economies, according ... Read More »

Gov. Inslee’s Snake River dam study wasted money telling us what we already know

From the Tri-City Herald Breaching the Snake River dams is a divisive proposal — we’ve known that for decades. So why did the state need to spend $750,000 to tell us what we already know? That’s the three-quarter-million-dollar question. Read the rest of the article here. Read More »