Author Archives: Trista Crossley

Washington to adopt California ban on diesel trucks

From the Capital Press Washington will follow California’s lead and ban new diesel trucks beginning in 2036, a governor’s spokesman said Tuesday. The governor’s office was going over the rule passed April 28 by the California Air Resources Board and does not have a timeline for adopting it, spokesman Mike Faulk said in an email. “We’re still reviewing California’s actions, ... Read More »

Crop progress report 05/07: Some rain but good growth in Washington

From NASS There were 5.8 days suitable for fieldwork in Washington, down from 7 days reported last week. Western Washington saw good grass growth and leafing out on raspberry and blueberry plants. Farmers continued to prepare fields for planting. In Skagit County, activities were behind because of the cold and wet spring conditions. Some parts of central Washington saw precipitation ... Read More »

US Plains farmers brace for historically poor winter wheat harvest

From agriculture.com Production prospects for the U.S. winter wheat crop are the worst in recent memory in core areas of the Great Plains following a three-year drought, farmers and crop experts said. “I don’t know how to put it into words how bad it is,” said farmer Gary Millershaski in southwest Kansas, among the areas hit hardest by drought. He ... Read More »

NAWG testifies at farm safety net hearing 

National Association of Wheat Growers President and Klamath Falls, OR wheat farmer Brent Cheyne, testified in front of the Senate Agriculture Subcommittee on Commodities, Risk Management, and Trade during the “Commodity Programs, Credit, and Crop Insurance – Part 1: Producer Perspectives on The Farm Safety Net” hearing. “With the rising input costs, decreasing net farm income, and the smallest winter ... Read More »

Crop progress report 04/30: Warm Washington weather

From NASS There were 7 days suitable for fieldwork in Washington, up from 5.8 days the previous week. Western Washington saw warmer temperatures and improved pasture growth. Spring planted crops emerged, and grass growth was noticeable. Berry farmers laid out irrigation piping, and newly planted strawberries emerged. Central Washington also saw warmer temperatures, and spring work was underway. Grass was ... Read More »

Stripe rust report May 1: No rust found in commercial fields

By Dr. Xianming Chen On April 26 and 27, we were planting spring cereal nurseries and taking the first notes of the winter nurseries at Mount Vernon, Wash. The winter plants were at middle jointing stage (Feekes 6 on average). Wheat stripe rust was up to 80% severity on susceptible varieties. Barley stripe rust was up to 40% severity. The ... Read More »

Commentary: President needs to visit dams before siding with breaching advocates

By U.S. Reps. Dan Newhouse and Cathy McMorris Rodgers Special to the Walla Walla Union-Bulletin Last month, President Biden signaled his support for tearing out four federal hydroelectric dams that are integral to energy reliability, navigation, and irrigation in the Pacific Northwest. Here’s our message to the president: Come visit our communities and see the river system with your own eyes ... Read More »

NAWG testifies during 2023 Farm Bill hearing 

National Association of Wheat Growers (NAWG) President and Klamath Falls, Ore., wheat farmer Brent Cheyne, testified in front of the House Agriculture Subcommittee on General Farm Commodities, Risk Management, and Credit where he joined the “Producer Perspectives on the 2023 Farm Bill” hearing. Cheyne highlighted NAWG’s primary farm bill priorities, including the importance of maintaining and enhancing crop insurance, both ... Read More »

Number of U.S. farms continues to decline, but farm size grows slightly

After peaking at 6.8 million farms in 1935, the number of U.S. farms and ranches fell sharply through the early 1970s. Rapidly falling farm numbers in the mid-20th century reflect the growing productivity of agriculture, increased mechanization, and increased nonfarm employment opportunities. Since 1982, the number of U.S. farms has continued to decline, but much more slowly. In 2022, there ... Read More »

Crop progress report 04/23:  April Showers, Cooler Temperatures Continued in Washington

From NASS There were 5.8 days suitable for fieldwork in Washington, up from 5.4 days last week. Western Washington saw cool weather, and slow pasture growth continued. Central Washington had a wet and cold week that was too wet for seeding and too cold for growing. Yakima County continued to see colder-than-normal April temperatures with overcast skies and rain. Early ... Read More »